The Tenth Witness (Henri Poincare Mystery)

March 4, 2015 - Comment

Boston Globe Best Crime Fiction, 2013 On the night of October 9, 1799, the frigate HMS Lutine breaks apart on the shoals of the Frisian Islands off the Dutch coast. When the insurer Lloyds of London pays on the wreck, it takes ownership and plans expeditions to recoup the lost millions in gold and silver.

Buy Now! $13.82Amazon.com Price
(as of November 22, 2017 12:51 pm CST - Details)

Boston Globe Best Crime Fiction, 2013

On the night of October 9, 1799, the frigate HMS Lutine breaks apart on the shoals of the Frisian Islands off the Dutch coast. When the insurer Lloyds of London pays on the wreck, it takes ownership and plans expeditions to recoup the lost millions in gold and silver. Nearly two hundres years later, after a series of largely failed salvage operations, Lloyds tries again – this time on the strength of new technologies and a strategy devised by the gifted young engineer Henri Poincare.

It is late spring, 1978. Poincare has worked to near-exhaustion preparing for the Lutine dive. Before the salvage season begins, he takes a rare holiday: a hike at low tide across the vast, muddy flats of the Wadden Sea. His guide is Liesel Kraus – smart, able, appealing…and troubled. She and her brother Anselm, directors of Kraus Steel, are haunted by a violent history that generates both rage and an enormous, corrupting wealth. The closer Poincare draws to Liesel and Anselm, the more warped life becomes until love and a death threat compel him to investigate what no one else – aside from Interpol – will. Pain as well as treasure, he discovers, can be dredged up from the past to reshape the present.

The Tenth Whitness, a prequel to the award-winning All Cry Chaos, is the tale of a man upended: a twenty-eight year old who rejects a brilliant career in engineering for an uncertain, darker one: international police work.

Comments

Robert Pater says:

Wonderful, interesting, beautifully written – highly recommended I’ve just finished The Tenth Witness and am left with that too-rare bittersweet aftertaste common to many bookaholics: thoroughly enjoyed this tasty and wonderful read, but disappointed that I’ll have to wait to devour another book in the Henri Poincare series. Akin to concluding a heartfelt visit to great friends. Please write more and faster, Leonard Rosen!This is a meticulously plotted mystery that is simultaneously character driven. It’s a prequel to the wonderful “All Cry Chaos” (read this!), illuminating Henri’s evolving path from a youthful, becoming-successful engineer toward becoming a gifted Interpol agent/detective.The Tenth Witness is related by Henri – and how I love well-done literature that reveals the perceptions, thoughts and conflicts of a multi-layered character in a way that only first-person POV can do – who is intelligent, thoughtful, perceptive, determined – as well as driven by an internal moral beacon.Overall verdict?: Great…

Shannah says:

Facing difficult human characteristics Leonard Rosen’s second book The Tenth Witness is a fresh look at how the human characteristics that enabled the horrors of Nazi Germany are still all too present in more recent history, in small and large ways and in the dynamics of individuals and countries.Having grown up with extensive education about the Holocaust it is never an easy subject for me to read about. Nevertheless, this book is well worth reading, reminding us all that at some level the dark side of human nature is never as remote as we would hope.I am a bigger fan of All Cry Chaos, Rosen’s first book. The concepts I felt were unique and compelling and this is perhaps why I give 4 verses 5 stars. My book club read The Tenth Witness and had Mr. Rosen as a guest on Skype. Mr. Rosen is extremely generous with his time and open to all views about the book. I encourage other book clubs to think about this unique opportunity. Among the book club members who read both books the majority preferred The…

C. Christensen says:

Disappointing follow up 0

Write a comment

*