THE LONG WAY HOME: A Journey from South Boston to Redemption

January 19, 2016 - Comment

“Southie was much more than a mere dot on a map; it was a state of mind.” So begins McIntyre’s remarkable memoir, The Long Way Home, an insightful book that chronicles his journey from the streets of South Boston to the cross. Through his eyes McIntyre paints a mental picture of real life in South

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“Southie was much more than a mere dot on a map; it was a state of mind.”

So begins McIntyre’s remarkable memoir, The Long Way Home, an insightful book that chronicles his journey from the streets of South Boston to the cross. Through his eyes McIntyre paints a mental picture of real life in South Boston during the 1950’s and 60’s and again in the 1980’s and 90’s capturing all of Southie’s strengths and foibles. He writes with brutal honesty of his decline from a straight A student attending Boston Latin School to a violence and alcohol addicted teenager and his loyalty to the “corner”.
McIntyre’s marriage in the 60’s posed a new problem. He had to choose between the “corner” and family. He chose family and moved to the suburbs, obtained his first real job with the Gillette Company and attended Northeastern University nights. After 25 years in the corporate world, McIntyre returned to South Boston in 1985 to partner in the ill-fated purchase of a liquor store from Whitey Bulger.
Twenty tough, tenuous years followed filled with Grand Jury appearances, a raid on the liquor store by the DEA, and ongoing investigations by the IRS as well as by the Boston Police and the Massachusetts State Police. The relentless media attention tracked each turn resulting in a civil suit, bankruptcy and much more. During this arduous time, McIntyre knew Bulger personally, therefore the book depicts Whitey Bulger in a slightly different light because their relationship wasn’t dependent on crime.
In a surprising twist, even to McIntyre, he was “born again” at sixty years old in a spiritual experience that resolved much of life’s early anguish and renewed his hope. The last three chapters relate how God works in his life with continual blessings and how God redeemed his poor life choices with a new purpose in life.

Comments

Michael D. Bradford says:

Pleasantly surprised Honestly, I was expecting a more violent story (like all of the other books I’ve read on the subject) but as it turned out, I was much impressed with the direction this book went, and I came away really appreciating what the author has gone through in his life. I’m not a super religious person, but the last three chapters were inspiring. They left me wanting to step-up my own relationship with God.

Robert says:

Great story A well told story about South Boston, its values, and one man’s life journey. It is an intriguing account of Bo’s redemption. I always love a well written redemption story, and in this case, I know the man behind the story and he is the real deal. I have had the privilege of watching the last part of the story unfold, and it is an interesting account of one man’s transformational journey home to God. Great read for anyone interested in South Boston, stories of second chances, and real life…

DAC Peacemaker says:

A terrific story I know the author and, even though I was privy to many of the book’s details, I was taken aback once again by this powerful story; I shuddered, I laughed, I sighed, I shook my head in disbelief, I felt pain in my heart, I wept, I was thankful for Bo as my friend. I was particularly drawn in by the vividly described “Southie” families, neighborhoods, culture, and its cast of characters which I really appreciated. In the end, however, this book is a testimony to the goodness and power of God who…

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