The Autumn of the Patriarch

April 21, 2014 - Comment

One of Gabriel García Márquez’s most intricate and ambitious works, The Autumn of the Patriarch is a brilliant tale of a Caribbean tyrant andthe corruption of power. From charity to deceit, benevolence to violence, fear of God to extreme cruelty, the dictator of The Autumn of the Patriarch embodies the best and the worst of

Buy Now! $7.49Amazon.com Price
(as of 4:58 am CST - Details)

One of Gabriel García Márquez’s most intricate and ambitious works, The Autumn of the Patriarch is a brilliant tale of a Caribbean tyrant andthe corruption of power.

From charity to deceit, benevolence to violence, fear of God to extreme cruelty, the dictator of The Autumn of the Patriarch embodies the best and the worst of human nature. Gabriel García Márquez, the renowned master of magical realism, vividly portrays the dying tyrant caught in the prison of his own dictator-ship. Employing an innovative, dreamlike style, and overflowing with symbolic descriptions, the novel transports the reader to a world that is at once fanciful and real.

Comments

Robert S. Newman "Bob Newman" says:

A Lie is More Useful than Love This is not a novel with a story, though it is a monstrous tale. It is a fantastic description of the rotten guts of tyranny. Enormous, steaming sentences, reeking with exotic images and jaguar tracks contain a sorrowful epic of the surreal politics of hot, underdeveloped places that know more corruption than justice. Weaving in and out, from one person’s thoughts to another’s, from one time to a second, with almost no dialogue, no conversation, no quotation marks, but moving from the mind…

GeoX "GeoX" says:

Works for me. It’s inevitable that this book should be somewhat off-putting compared to One Hundred Years of Solitude or Love in the Time of Cholera–Autumn of the Patriarch isn’t really meant to be a ‘pleasant’ read. It is a grim portrait of the title character, and other characters come and go without having inner lives of their own; they have relevance only insofar as they intersect with his life. It is without a doubt one of the least novelistic novels you will ever read–indeed, in many ways it’s more…

Write a comment

*