And Then It’s Spring (Booklist Editor’s Choice. Books for Youth (Awards))

December 18, 2013 - Comment

Following a snow-filled winter, a young boy and his dog decide that they’ve had enough of all that brown and resolve to plant a garden. They dig, they plant, they play, they wait . . . and wait . . . until at last, the brown becomes a more hopeful shade of brown, a sign

Buy Now! $5.00Amazon.com Price
(as of 5:57 am CDT - Details)

Following a snow-filled winter, a young boy and his dog decide that they’ve had enough of all that brown and resolve to plant a garden. They dig, they plant, they play, they wait . . . and wait . . . until at last, the brown becomes a more hopeful shade of brown, a sign that spring may finally be on its way. Julie Fogliano’s tender story of anticipation is brought to life by the distinctive illustrations Erin E. Stead, recipient of the 2011 Caldecott Medal.  And Then It’s Spring is one The Washington Post’s Best Kids Books of 2012.One of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Children’s Books of 2012Amazon Best Books of the Month for Kids, February 2012: and then it’s spring pays homage to the hopefulness and anticipation that accompanies planting the first seeds of spring in the dark soil of winter–waiting, checking, waiting, wondering if the first green shoots will ever come and imagining all the things that could have gone wrong for those little seeds. Then one day spring is suddenly, gloriously, here–replacing the brown with shades of green happiness. Illustrations by 2011 Caldecott Medalist Erin Stead (A Sick Day for Amos McGee) match the graceful simplicity of the text, capturing the emotion of the characters and expanding the story with whimsical details. –Seira Wilson

Comments

Martha Frankel says:

Patience as a virtue in a world where even toddlers grab their iPads for instant gratification, what a treat to read a book where patience is the abiding theme. Julie Fogliano’s writing hits us in the gut because it is so simple, yet so stirring. and Erin Stead’s drawings give off a whiff of hope. An instant classic

nosmatnot says:

Mudliscious The language is playful and childlike (“please don’t step here. there are seeds and they are trying”), in the way that good poetic language often is. The title even reminds me of that ee cummings poem [in Just–] (“…when the world is mud-/ luscious…). The writing in and then it’s spring is kind of a hybrid of that and my favorite Karla Kuskin-y, Ruth Krauss-ish goodness. Stead’s artwork is warm and charming and the brown is indeed hopeful–full of impending life and a reticulum of animal…

E. LeVan says:

Beautiful, just like SICK DAY FOR AMOS MCGEE (same illustrator). She is a great illustrator, wonderful really. This book has 1 sentence on each page with the exception of one page that has a short paragraph. The reading is meant more for an adult to do, as there were a few unusual words that I recall. Really great “asides” in the illustrations. If you like Sick Day for Amos McGee, which is by this same illustrator and her husband as the writer, then you will like this.Simple. Mostly about the illustrations, to me.I will use this in my…

Write a comment

*