A Long Way from Home

February 8, 2016 - Comment

Spanning more than sixty years, A Long Way from Home is the story of Susie; her daughter, Clara; and her granddaughter, Susan–house slaves born and reared at Montpelier, the Virginia plantation of President James Madison. Proud and intelligent, these women are united by love, fierce devotion, and a desire for freedom that grows stronger year

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Spanning more than sixty years, A Long Way from Home is the story of Susie; her daughter, Clara; and her granddaughter, Susan–house slaves born and reared at Montpelier, the Virginia plantation of President James Madison. Proud and intelligent, these women are united by love, fierce devotion, and a desire for freedom that grows stronger year by year.

A Long Way from Home vividly re-creates Southern life and the ambivalent, shifting relationships on both sides of the color divide, from the cruelty and insidious benevolence of white owners to the deep yearnings and complex emotions of the slaves themselves. It is an unforgettable story that pays homage to the African-American experience and to the ancestors whose lives and histories are indelibly entwined with our own.In Connie Briscoe’s third novel, the connotations of home are anything but heartwarming. For an enslaved mother, daughter, and grandmother, Montpelier plantation in Virginia is a living hell–and the proprietor, at least initially, is none other than President James Madison. A Long Way from Home opens during Madison’s lifetime, when Susie and her daughter Clara serve the First Couple as house slaves. Yet even this regime seems civilized compared to the havoc unleashed by Madison’s brutal stepson. As Clara fends off (and ultimately succumbs to) the sexual advances of one master after another, the author conjures up the entire world of the “peculiar institution.”

It is Susie’s granddaughter and namesake, Susan, who first leaves Montpelier. Not, of course, voluntarily: she is sold to a family living in Richmond. Chained in the back of a departing wagon, she “clenched her teeth and stared at the sky. How dare the day be so clear, so beautiful, on this, the worst day of her life.” But as the Civil War erupts, Susan ponders the possibility of a more joyous liberation. As Briscoe makes clear, the prospect elicited a complex blend of emotions from many slaves–Susan, for example, has been lulled into considering herself a part (if a diminished part) of her white master’s family. A Long Way from Home does occasionally fall back on the pat formulas of the television miniseries, and Briscoe doesn’t manage to quite ignite Susan’s conflicted feelings about bondage and freedom. But Susan’s postwar travails do convey the reality that Reconstruction was not only a political process but also a painfully personal one. –Katherine Anderson

Comments

Devin Bent says:

Historic accuracy in a great novel. I could not put this novel down. I just read from begining to end without stopping. I was fascinated. What really impressed was the research behind the novel. The novel fits in well with what is known about those times.

Michele McCoy says:

Excellent Read I normally do not have an interest in books of this era, however, a close friend suggested I try it. I just completed this work and it was excellent. It was totally different from Ms. Briscoe’s other works, which I read. I am a native of Virginia and I found the historical information to be spellbounding. The characters were believable and they received my compassion and yes, sometimes anger at their actions. I thought she went from generation to generation smoothly without alot of…

A Customer says:

Ingenious I hate reading time pieces, and I hate books whose subject remotely deals with slavery, but I loved “A Long Way From Home.” The idea of weaving a story from the perspective of a young girl, and from the female ancestory line was very creative and inventive. I read the book in five hours. I was captivated by the ingenious way that Connie told her story. BRAVO! Don’t let the subject matter deter you from reading this novel..it’s the method of writing that will interest you.

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